Brief History of Moringa

 In Blog

The history of the Moringa tree begins on the Indian subcontinent around 2000 BCE. There, it was used in history of the Moringa traditional medicine for 300 conditions ranging in severity from minor skin blemishes to more serious illnesses like asthma, high blood pressure and heart disease, ulcers and kidney stones, as well as respiratory illnesses like tuberculosis.


From India it spread to ancient Egypt, where it was used as a natural sunscreen to protect against the harsh desert environment; and then eventually to Greece and Rome where it served an important role as both an ointment and expensive perfume.

The progress of the plant also moved westward into Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands (most notably the Philippines), where its unique nutritional qualities caused it to become a staple vegetable in the local diet.

Moringa is cultivated around the worldToday, Moringa is cultivated around the world, primarily in poorer regions with harsh climates where the many uses for Moringa are needed most—places like Ethiopia, Haiti, Ghana, Honduras, Indonesia and Uganda.

People have long understood the value of the Moringa tree in promoting health and sustainability around the world. That is why Dead Sea Moringa partners with Trees for the Future to bring the bounty of Moringa to the people who have the greatest need for its riches.


Why do we believe in Moringa?

Dead Sea Moringa

Dead Sea Moringa

At Dead Sea Moringa, we are committed to humanitarian aid projects throughout the world, in part because moringa has been shown to curb malnutrition in as little as three months, making it a powerful tool in the fight against malnutrition worldwide. To that end, we have partnered with Trees for the Future to plant moringa trees in over 19 countries where hunger and undernourishment are claiming hundreds of thousands of victims.

Through our Buy One Get One Tree campaign, Dead Sea Moringa fights malnutrition by planting one moringa tree for every bottle sold!

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